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“I Can’t Live Without Culture Anymore”: The way we read science fiction as demonstrated through Kurt Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions

Til Knowles | I have no culture, no humane harmony in my brains. I can’t live without culture anymore. What do you want from your science fiction? Detailed descriptions of non existent utopias? Interstellar wars fought with weapons blueprinted from tomorrow’s technology? Humour? The meaning of life? We are lucky enough to be living in…

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In the Eye of the Beholder? The Unadulterated Beautiful and the Threatening Grotesque in a Selection of Young Adult Science Fiction Narratives

Rebecca Hutton, Alyson Miller, Elizabeth Braithwaite | Science fiction, according to Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr. (2008, 187), “elicits from its audiences a feeling of hesitation facing two intertwined but distinct questions about the imaginary world represented in the text. On the one hand, it asks whether the imaginary changes are possible; on the other, what their…

Invitation to the Feed

Invitation to the Feed: The Body and the Environment in a Selection of Dystopian YA Science Fictions

Rebecca Hutton, Alyson Miller, Elizabeth Braithwaite | Technology, the environment, and the young adult figure often exist in an uneasy yet inextricable relationship in many young adult fictions dealing with dystopian futures. Nature and the artificial are frequently constructed as binaries that the young person must negotiate or resist in order to survive and preserve…

The Knife of Never Letting Go page detail

Dystopian States of Mind: Identity, Mental Health, and the Private-Public Sphere in The Hunger Games and Chaos Walking

Roslyn Weaver |  Although science fiction is maligned in some quarters as escapism, two recent, popular young adult dystopian series offer themes that parallel realities of contemporary teenage life, primarily around identity in a world where internet and social media have dissolved the boundaries between private and public spheres. The following discussion focuses on these…

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Transitions, transfers and transgressions: (temporary) trans* wish-fulfilment in SF body-exchange narratives

Rebecca Hutton , Deakin University |   ‘The purpose of a thought-experiment, as the term was used by Schrödinger and other physicists, is not to predict the future […] but to describe reality, the present world.’ —   Ursula K. Le Guin[i] Science fiction, according to Pearson, Hollinger and Gordon’s Queer universes: sexualities in science fiction,…

King's Dream of New York

Science fiction cities

Carl Abbott, School of Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University, USA | Nothing says trouble like a city smashed to smithereens on screen. Meteors and earthquakes, tsunamis and glaciers, earthly monsters and alien invaders – moviegoers might think that the only thing science fiction does with cities is demolish them with big budget special…